DISRUPT. Filipina Women: Proud. Loud. Leading Without A Doubt: Coverage

For the last event of the year, in collaboration with Women’s Pathway to Leadership Asia, Bridging GAP hosted His Excellency Ambassador Morales and Dr. Astrid Tuminez to launch a new book by Filipina Women’s Network “DISRUPT. Filipina Women: Proud, Loud, and Leading Without a Doubt”.

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Speakers

Ambassador Morales previously served as Deputy Chief of Mission at the Philippine Embassy in Beijing, Consul General in Milan, Italy, and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and Deputy Consul General in San Francisco in the United States. He has also been posted to Rome in Italy and Ankara in Turkey.

His Excellency Mr Antonio A. Morales

His Excellency Mr Antonio A. Morales and Dr. Astrid Tuminez

Dr Astrid S. Tuminez, adjunct professor of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy and Regional Director, Legal and Corporate Affairs (Southeast Asia) for Microsoft. 

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Program

Ambassador Morales’ speech was summarized by Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy as below:

“A common stereotype of Asians, particularly of Asian women, is that they tend to suppress the expression of their views. Filipino women, however, debunk this stereotype, said Mr Antonio A. Morales, Ambassador of the Philippines to Singapore. Speaking at the book launch of DISRUPT. Filipina Women: Proud. Loud. Leading Without A Doubt, which was held at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy on April 17, he said, “I’ve yet to meet a Filipino woman who is not opinionated and who is afraid to express her views.”

Pre-colonial Filipino society was matriarchal, said Ambassador Morales, and the Babaylan, a priestess, occupied an elevated place in the community. Members of the community would come to her for help, healing and leadership. But when Spain colonised the Philippines, she was stripped of her position and ostracised by the community. The spirit of the Babylan lives on, however, and in a typical Filipino family, it’s the women who have the last say, he added.

Ambassador Morales noted that the Philippines has had two woman presidents since 1946 while the country’s incumbent chief justice is the only female to fill the role in Southeast Asia, and one of only six female chief justices globally. He said Filipino women will take matters into their own hands, which may explain the feminisation of migration from the late 1980s until the early 1990s. “When faced with extreme poverty, a bleak future and not a lot of opportunities in the Philippines at the time, Filipino women decided to search for greener pastures elsewhere.” (Full Review)

We also invited 6 students to pick their favourite excerpts from the DISRUPT book to read aloud to the audience. They chose their favourite stories and the “leadership tips” from the book. Pieces of essays by Gloria T. Caoile, Cris Comerford, Sonia T. Delen-Fitzimmons,  Nina D. Aguas, Ernestina Delos Santos-Mac and Dr. Astrid Tuminez were shared with the audience.

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Attendees

Amongst the crowd of students, staff, and LKYSPP community, the event welcomed members of the public, Filipino diaspora in Singapore, and their friends and colleagues from all backgrounds. The discussion surrounded the importance of identity and how to influence these salient cultural norms for better progress both at home and abroad. Audience shared their own stories and experience with the Filipino identity and how it has profoundly affected their family and professional lives. Moreover, after the book reading, members of the audience agreed that the hard work, perseverance, and resilience of the contributors to the book was a powerful message for everyone to share.

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Interview

Dessy Sukendar (previous post here), member of Bridging GAP, also conducted an Exclusive Interview with Astrid S. Tuminez on the DISRUPT Book and other issues on gender equality:

We hope you enjoyed the session and do follow us on Twitter or Like us on Facebook to keep updated on events next year.

Pictures courtesy of Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy. Our deepest gratitude for their support.

This event was brought to you by Bridging GAP (Gender and Policy) and Women Pathways to Leadership in Asia.

Bridging GAP is a group of graduate students at LEE KUAN YEW SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY that came together to raise awareness and engage students and faculty on a variety of gender-related policy issues.

Women Pathways to Leadership in Asia is a joint project looking at women leadership in Asia sponsored by the LEE KUAN YEW SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY, the ASIA FOUNDATION and the ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION. 

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EVENT: Book Launch of “DISRUPT. Filipina Women: Proud. Loud. Leading Without A Doubt”

We’re hosting a Book Launch on 17 April 2015 with Women’s Pathway to Leadership Asia. We would like to warmly invite you to this special event:

Title:                     DISRUPT. Filipina Women: Proud. Loud. Leading Without A Doubt

Speaker:              His Excellency Mr Antonio A. Morales, Ambassador of the Philippines to Singapore

Date & Time:      Friday, 17 April 2015, 12.15pm – 1.30pm

Venue:                 Seminar Room 3-5, Level 3, Manasseh Meyer Building, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy

RSVP:                Please email lkyschoolevents@nus.edu.sg or click here

The talk will be chaired by Dr Astrid S. Tuminez, Regional Director, Legal and Corporate Affairs (Southeast Asia), Microsoft & Adjunct Professor, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy.

Event Description

Many women from the Philippines work as domestic helpers in Singapore, Hong Kong, the Middle East and other countries, creating an often disturbing stereotype of Filipina women as maids. The new book, DISRUPT. Filipina Women: Proud. Loud. Leading Without A Doubt, seizes the challenge of redefining Filipina women. It is the first book on leadership written by Filipino women leaders from around the world. Published by the Filipina Women’s Network, the book examines how Filipina women in diaspora tackle and prosper in the challenges of living in the modern, multi-cultural and global environment. Containing personal essays by 37 Filipino women leaders in diaspora, the book aims to change public perception of Filipino women and showcase their capacity to lead. These leaders share their career journeys, sacrifices they endured to seek better lives for themselves and their families, and successes enjoyed in many countries. The stories provide insights into shaping leaders’ identities, cultural adjustments, and victories over poverty, discrimination and harassment. In addition to a discussion on stories inside the book by 37 members of Filipina Women’s Network, several students will also be doing a reading of excerpts from the book.

About the Speaker

Prior to his assumption as top Philippine envoy to Singapore, Ambassador Morales served as Deputy Chief of Mission at the Philippine Embassy in Beijing. He also served as Consul General in Milan, Italy and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and as Deputy Consul General in San Francisco. He was also posted in Rome and Ankara.

In the home office, Ambassador Morales served as Special Assistant at the Office of the Undersecretary for Ocean and Special Concerns, Executive Director at the Office of Consular Affairs, Director at the Authentication Division of the Office of Consular Affairs and as Acting Director at the Office European Affairs. Before joining the Department of Foreign Affairs, Ambassador Morales worked at the Office of the Press Secretary.

Ambassador Morales earned his law degree at the University of the Philippines in 1990 and passed the Bar Examinations the same year. He undertook further studies in diplomacy and foreign relations at the Multilateral Diplomacy, Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva, Switzerland, and at the International Relations Course, Escuela Diplomatica, Madrid, Spain.

This is an event that you could not miss! Details found in the attached flyer below:

Book Launch by His Excellency Mr Antonio A. Morales, 17 April 2015, LKYSPP

Book Launch by His Excellency Mr Antonio A. Morales, 17 April 2015, LKYSPP

Notes from the Field: Catching a Glimpse of the Changing Women’s Role in Japan

Update (May 2015): This post was featured in the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy Monthly Broadcast – April 2015: http://eepurl.com/bmfdaD

by Dessy Sukendar

Like many East Asian countries, Japan has had its fair share of so-called “family-policy”-related issues, including aging population and low birth rates. The role and the environment in which Japanese women exist in the public and private sphere is a recurring theme throughout our discussions on Japan’s shrinking demography during the student-run 5th Japan Trip at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy. Most importantly, the advent of Abenomics specifically signified the intention to transform the environment for women spurred robust debates. The initiative aims to provide the social policy infrastructure necessary to provide space for women to participate actively in its economy, both to boost productivity of the workforce, as well as potentially counter the demographic issue. This initiative is based on sound so-called “womenomics”: a study by Goldman Sachs (2014) claims that increasing opportunities for women may increase GDP by nearly 15% in Japan. Moreover, Japan has a significant potential in improving its gender diversity, as it lags behind in global gender rankings relative to other developed countries, reaching only 104th out of 142 countries in the World Economic Forum’s “Global Gender Gap Report 2014,” (2013: 105th place out of 136 countries). The WEF report points to two areas of improvement: Political Empowerment and Economic Participation and Opportunity (Figure 1). Based on our cursory interactions with different groups within the Japanese society, during our Japan trip, I concur with this assessment.

Women in Public Sector

We were lucky to have met MP Karen Makishima during our trip, who travelled to see our delegation to deliver a moving message about the significance of Girl’s Day and its resonance during the 3/11 anniversary. Unfortunately, just as I had observed during our visit to the National Diet (Japanese National Parliament) earlier that day, MP Makishima remains the minority amongst her peers. Japan’s underrepresentation of women in public life is the most obvious glass ceiling to break. In our conversation after her speech, Karen cites the challenges of changing societal perception of women by the “grandfather’s generation”, who are often sceptical of women in prominent positions in the public sphere. The Inter-Parliamentary Union ranks Japan 144th out of 189 countries in terms of its ratio of female MPs (Lower House: 9.5% and Upper House: 15.7%), well below its neighbours South Korea or Singapore, a record that is consistent in local chambers, where more than 40% have no female members at all. Without significant representation at the decision-making powers, Japan is missing out from other potential benefits of sustained female engagement in leadership positions.

Business Case for Gender Diversity

McKinsey’s 2013 iteration of Women Matters study found that women remain underrepresented at just 1% of corporate board in Japan, the lowest out of developed countries (PDF). Yuriko Keiko writes:

“Women currently hold an estimated 9% of senior management positions in Japan, compared to 40% in the Philippines, 24% in France, and 22% in the United States. Although the employment rate of women in Japan reached 69.5% in 2013, more than 65.1% of women leave the workplace prematurely, mostly owing to childbirth” (Project Syndicate)

This pattern results from institutional impediments to achieving a viable work-family balance combined with societal pressures. One discussion regarding solutions to reverse demographic challenges brought up the issues such as high cost of daycare, the double-burden, and corporate culture dominated by male executives that are expected to be present at all times, all of which are counterintuitive to the “double-burden” issue. Devin Stewart pointed to several cases in his piece on the uphill battle of working mothers, depicted in this viral video released last year:

Catalyst’s study in 2014 (PDF) found that Japanese women are expected to be primary caregivers to children, reflected in the sharp drop in the workforce during child-bearing age, while Japanese men not having that same burden during the same period. Moreover, the issue in the “leak in the pipeline”, a drop of women’s participation in the economy due to child-rearing responsibilities, contributes to the lack of women in managerial levels. The dearth of female role models in prominent private sector positions matter, as efforts to change the perception could ring hollow without any visible presence of role models. Otherwise, women are still expected to be both the primary caregiver while also acting as the engines of growth in the new Japanese economy, without any significant rebalancing of responsibilities in the household. % Women in Boardroom, McKinsey (2013)

Visibility Matters

Throughout our trip, I encountered striking stereotypes perpetuated in the media and society-for instance, differing sizes of souvenir mugs for women, questionable portrayal of women and girls in the media and advertisement- that can, of course, also be found in other societies. This is not new, many Asian societies have a skewed conception of women due to hundreds of years of tradition. However, I also encountered the large role of both women in the rural families and within disaster reconstruction areas. Their contribution as productive participants in recovery efforts and livelihood in the villages are visibly no less than men. This grassroots reality have not translated to higher-level engagement of women in public and private sphere, and in fact gets less prominent as we get closer to business districts and parliamentary chambers. What is missing here? 

Two of our members and Prof. Suzaina Kadir, Associate Dean (Admissions & Academic Programmes) chatted with MP Karen Makishima (MP of Kangawa 17th District) at the annual Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy Japan Trip Photo by: Daisuke Asano

Two of Bridging GAP members and Prof. Suzaina Kadir, Associate Dean (Admissions & Academic Programmes) chatted with MP Karen Makishima (MP of Kangawa 17th District) at the annual Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy Japan Trip
Photo by: Daisuke Asano

Japan’s current predicament provides the glimpse of the future of Asia, and makes the case that we have to continue to work hard to overcome the perception and stereotypes even after countries have become “first world” or developed in gender parity indicators such as education and health. During International Women’s Day, Facebook recognized initiatives like the all-Obachan Party and their efforts to engage more women to join as representatives in public sphere. Devin Stewart have also described many progressive changes regarding the portrayal of working mothers, aided by civil society organizations. There is a developing conversation about how to provide better opportunities for women’s entry into more prominent roles. Sufficient international pressure is also present, for instance WEF recently surveyed hundreds of Japanese women to highlight the desired measures (PDF).

I hope the government in earnest seeks to increase women’s participation beyond its economic utility. Societal change, including how women are perceived at both the public and private sphere are very much informed with traditions prevalent in different forms even in Southeast Asia. The success of Japan to drive change in gender equality will be a significant milestone not only for itself but for Asia, as our societies start to put action to the notion that not only are women an underutilized resource, but women are in fact partners in development. I am moved by the bold statement from the government of Japan in gender diversity and will continue to be cautiously optimistic such deep mindset changes can occur solely for the sake of the economy and demographic changes. The case for women’s role in Japan will continue to be a cause that must be pursued for its own sake and Japan’s success in this initiative will be a model for what’s to come in other Asian societies.

References

Stewart, Devin. “Abenomics Meets Womenomics.” Foreign Affairs. January 29, 2015. Accessed March 4, 2015.

Catalyst. The Case for Gender Diversity in Japan. New York: Catalyst, May 21, 2014.

McKinsey, Women Matter 2013: Moving corporate culture, moving boundaries. 

Matsui, Kathy, Hiromi Suzuki, Kazunori Tatebe, Tsumugi Akiba, “Womenomics 4.0: Time to Walk the Talk” Goldman Sachs, May 2014

Yuriko Koike, “Abenomics’ Women Problem”, Project Syndicate, http://po.st/fciWx1

Tuminez, Astrid. “Rising to the top? : A Report on Women’s Leadership in Asia” Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore, 2012.

Dessy Sukendar is a Master of Public Policy candidate at Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore. Any thoughts are welcome at @dessyS.

Women Leaders in Technology Event

Our event Women Leaders in Technology was a technology-centric affair. We were honoured to host Amelia Agarwal (Microsoft), Elizabeth Hernandez (HP), Frederique Covington (Twitter), and Rosaline Chow Koo (ConneXionsAsia) this week, alongside Dr. Astrid S. Tuminez (Microsoft), who spoke before the event in a video below: The enthusiasm in the room also spilled over to social media, both from audience and panelists!

The event started off with amazing turnout:

Some comments:

The aftermath was inspiring:

To our panelists, Dr. Astrid Tuminez, Amelia Agrawal, Elizabeth Hernandez, Frederique Covington, and Rosaline Chow Koo: Thank you very much for sharing some of your time and experiences to share tips on career, family, and social life navigation as women from more often-unlikely backgrounds- in technology sector. The takeaway of the event will enrich our learning and future paths to ‪#‎MakeItHappen‬! To our attendees, thank you for coming to see our distinguished panelists share a bit of their experience, their candid lessons learnt, and their view of the future of tech from their vibrant careers as women in technology sector.

We hope you enjoyed the session and do follow us on Twitter or Like us on Facebook to keep updated on events.

This event was brought to you by Bridging GAP (Gender and Policy) and Women Pathways to Leadership in Asia.

Bridging GAP is a group of graduate students at LEE KUAN YEW SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY that came together to raise awareness and engage students and faculty on a variety of gender-related policy issues.

Women Pathways to Leadership in Asia is a joint project looking at women leadership in Asia sponsored by the LEE KUAN YEW SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY, the ASIA FOUNDATION and the ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION. 

Documentary: The Queen of Code (Grace Hopper)

Screen Shot from Queen of Code (2015)

“All we talk about is Steve Jobs and Bill Gates”. – (Opening Remarks of Queen of Code (2015))
The Queen Of Code is an inspiring documentary on Grace Hopper, who was able to succeed in a number of male-dominated institutions: the U.S. Navy as well as the computing industry. As a rear admiral in the Navy, Hopper worked on the first computer, the Harvard Mark 1. And she headed the team that created the first compiler, which led to the creation of COBOL, a programming language that by the year 2000 accounted for 70 percent of all actively used code. Passing away in 1992, she left behind an inimitable legacy as a brilliant programmer and pioneering woman in male-dominated fields. Her story is as enigmatic as any other pioneers in their field and we highly recommend checking it out.

To watch the short documentary, click the following link “The Queen of Code,”(Links to FiveThirtyEight Website). This film directed by Gillian Jacobs and released by the amazing FiveThirtyEight’s “Signals” series.


We’re holding an event on Women in Technology Sector right here at LKYSPP, so please head on over to RSVP for the event after watching the film. Details below and in our blog post

Women Leaders in Technology: Why We do What We Do? at LKYSPP (16 Mar 5.15-6.30pm)

Women Leaders in Technology: Why We do What We Do? at LKYSPP (16 Mar 5.15-6.30pm)

“Women Leaders in Technology: Why We do What We Do?”

Chair: Dr. Astrid Tuminez, Regional Director, Legal and Corporate Affairs (Southeast Asia), Microsoft & Adjunct Professor Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy
Speakers:
Amelia Agarwal, Regional Director of OEM Marketing, Microsoft
Elizabeth Hernandez, Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Asia Pacific & Japan, HP
Frederique Covington, International Marketing Director, Twitter
Rosaline Chow Koo, Founder and CEO, ConneXionsAsia

Date/Time: 16 Mar 2015 (Mon) | 5.15PM – 6.30PM
Venue: Seminar Room 3-5, Manasseh Meyer, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy.
RSVP: lsaetova@u.nus.edu

Hope to see you there!

EVENT – Women Leaders in Technology: Why We do What We Do?

In 2013, the world saw the release of a much-acclaimed book, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg, currently the COO of Facebook, regarding her journey as a woman in tech company. Sandberg started the book with a recognizable story that resonate for many working mothers: her story of gaining a parking spot while being pregnant at Google. This story and other conversations following the book highlight the gender gap of women in STEM sector, including underrepresentation in technology to the forefront of conversations on gender in other sectors as well (See: Chart by GigaOm). We are happy to be able to hold the following seminar on the Women in Technology with top senior executives of various technology companies right here in Singapore. With the help of Women’s Pathway to Leadership Asia, we present Women Leaders in Technology: Why We do What We Do? on Monday, 16 March 2015. Details below: Synopsis: 

So, what is it really like for women to have a successful career in technology? Women leaders from Microsoft, HP, Twitter and CXA Group will share their experience in contributing to the success of technology companies, the rewards of doing so, and the challenges and opportunities that come with the territory.

Chair: Dr. Astrid Tuminez, Regional Director, Legal and Corporate Affairs (Southeast Asia), Microsoft and Adjunct Professor Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy About the Speakers:

  • Amelia Agrawal, Regional Director of OEM Marketing, Microsoft
    • Amelia Agrawal has been in the IT industry for 20 years, including more than 10 years with Microsoft. Over this time, she has accumulated a wealth of experience through roles spanning marketing, business management, product category management, PR and analyst relations. Currently the Regional Director of OEM Marketing for Microsoft across Asia Pacific, Amelia is responsible for driving marketing excellence across 18 countries to exceed revenue and market share goals.
  • Elizabeth Hernandez, Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Asia Pacific & Japan, HP
    • Elizabeth Hernandez joined HP in August 2010 as Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Asia Pacific & Japan. She is responsible for shaping public policy and building public-private partnerships with governments around the region. Before joining HP, she was Director, Government and Public Affairs, Asia Pacific at GlaxoSmithKline from 2005 to 2010. Elizabeth is a member of the Board of Amcham Singapore, the National Center for APEC, and the US-ASEAN Business Council.
  • Frederique Covington, International Marketing Director, Twitter
    • Frederique Covington joined Twitter in January 2014 as the International Marketing Director covering Asia Pacific, India, Middle East, Africa and Canada. In this capacity, she is responsible for marketing and messaging that helps businesses understand and embrace Twitter as a platform and its advertising solutions. Previously, Freddie was a Senior Director at Microsoft where she was the Central Marketing Organization (CMO) Lead for Asia-Pacific.
  • Rosaline Chow Koo, Founder and CEO, ConneXionsAsia
    • Rosaline Chow Koo isthefounder&CEOofCXA,atechstart-up disrupting Asia’s insurance industry.Before CXA,she led Mercer Marsh Benefits firm across 14 countries in Asia Pacific. Rosaline also led ACE Insurance and launched two tech start-ups during the dot-com boom. Prior to moving to Asia, Rosaline worked at Bankers Trust Company (now Deutsche Bank) in NYC and Procter & Gamble in Iowa. Rosaline is also a trained engineer.

Date/Time: 16 Mar 2015 (Mon) | 5.15PM – 6.30PM Venue: Seminar Room 3-5, Manasseh Meyer, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy. RSVP: Email your interest to lsaetova@u.nus.edu This event is FREE and OPEN to Public. We hope to see you there! Do follow us on Twitter or Like us on Facebook to keep updated on events.

Women Leaders in Technology: Why We do What We Do? at LKYSPP (16 Mar 5.15-6.30pm)

Women Leaders in Technology: Why We do What We Do? at LKYSPP (16 Mar 5.15-6.30pm)

This event was brought to you by Bridging GAP (Gender and Policy) Group and Women Pathways to Leadership in Asia.

Bridging GAP is a group of graduate students at LEE KUAN YEW SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY that came together to raise awareness and engage students and faculty on a variety of gender-related policy issues.

Women Pathways to Leadership in Asia is a joint project looking at women leadership in Asia sponsored by the LEE KUAN YEW SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY, the ASIA FOUNDATION and the ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 

EVENTS: Lunchtime Talk “Women in Politics” & “Persepolis” (2007) Screening

We’re kicking off 2015 to a great start thanks to two great collaborations:

Wed, 21 Jan 2015, 12.15-1.30pm, LKYSPP

Wed, 21 Jan 2015, 12.15-1.30pm, LKYSPP

1) Lunchtime Talk: “Women in Politics” by Anna Diamantoupolou (President of “Diktio” Network for Reform in Greece and Europe, Former EU Commissioner and Minister) in collaboration with Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy

Date/Time: 21 Jan 2015 (Wed) | 12.15-1.30pm
Venue: Seminar Room 3-5, Manasseh Meyer, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy
Chair: Prof. Suzaina Kadir, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy
RSVP: dessy.sukendar@nus.edu.sg

Synopsis: The path of progress for gender equality in Europe has brought to the forefront the challenges women face when they decide to enter the public sphere.
Ms Diamantopoulou reinforced the fact that women can accomplish anything that they put their minds into. In order for true progress to be made in the efforts towards gender equality, it is of paramount importance for influential women to be involved.

Admission is FREE so do sign up quick!

Tue, 27 Jan. 19.00-21.00pm

Tue, 27 Jan. 19.00-21.00pm

2) Persepolis (2007) screening in partnership with Singapore Committee for UN Women
Date/Time: 27 Jan 2015 (Tue) | 19:00PM – 21:00PM
Venue: Seminar Room 3-5, Manasseh Meyer, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy.
RSVP: bit.ly/janfilm

Synopsis: This is a screening and discussion of Persepolis, a film that explores the poignant story of an outspoken young girl in Iran during the Islamic Revolution and her global journey in search of home.
The film is based on Marjane Satrapi’s autobiographical graphic novel of the same name. In 1970s Iran, Marjane ‘Marji’ Satrapi idealistically watches the Iranian Revolution of 1979. However as Marji grows up, she witnesses first-hand how the new Iran, now ruled by Islamic fundamentalists, has become a repressive tyranny on its own. With Marji dangerously refusing to remain silent at this injustice, her parents send her abroad to Vienna to study for a better life. However, this change proves an equally difficult trial with the young woman finding herself in a different culture loaded with abrasive characters and profound disappointments that deeply trouble her. Even when she returns home, Marji finds that both she and homeland have changed too much and the young woman and her loving family must decide where she truly belongs.


The screening is FREE for LKYSPP students. UN Women Members: $5 | Non-Members: $10

We hope to see you there! Do follow us on Twitter or Like us on Facebook to keep updated on events.